Is this light sufficient?

Discussion in 'Planted Aquarium Tech' started by TroyZ, Sep 10, 2013.

  1. TroyZ

    TroyZ Active Member

  2. fishlady

    fishlady Well-Known Member

    I have that light on a 55 gallon and it seems to be working for the anubias and some val.
  3. TroyZ

    TroyZ Active Member

    Okay any idea how it would do with plants that demand more light like a sword?
  4. fishlady

    fishlady Well-Known Member

    I have no idea. I am surprized I have any plants alive LOL
    Cinnamonsticks likes this.
  5. Cinnamonsticks

    Cinnamonsticks Moderator

    Why not get LED meant for plant growth? Cost??

    Ted had a review on one on his page I think.
  6. TroyZ

    TroyZ Active Member

    Cost is almost double of this light. I'd rather spend 40dollars on some construction lamps then drop 160 on and led. Unfortunately I'm on a college student budget.
  7. fishlady

    fishlady Well-Known Member

    Looked at the link you provided but didn't see what they are asking for it. I found mine for $50 on ebay.
  8. Cinnamonsticks

    Cinnamonsticks Moderator

    If money was an option I would get some T5. I have a coral life twin bulb form amazon for $44.
  9. Marine590622

    Marine590622 Advisory Board Staff Member

    Not sure what to say, I don't see color temp or lumens provided so I could not address how well it will work.
  10. TroyZ

    TroyZ Active Member

    these are the specs that are on the box
    • 174x HQ 0.1W LED (162x 10000K daylight, 12x 460nm Actinic)
    • 1810 Lumen
    • Super slim housing in black finish.
    • 2 mode ON / OFF power switch ( Full mode / Lunar mode )
    • Full Splash guard
    • Expendable mounting bracket . 51" max lenght.
    • AC110-240V 50-60Hz AC adapter.
    • CE certitifed.
    • 2 prong plug ( US region or EU region). Custom plug for different region also available.
  11. Marine590622

    Marine590622 Advisory Board Staff Member

    They should grow plants. the 10000 K is a little above the prime but certainly usable, but 1810 lumens is only part of the story. What depth are we looking to penetrate to? if you use a standard 60 48 X 12 X 23.5 I think, then you need to penetrate to about 20 inches, I am thinking medium to high light are going to be border line at that depth. I could be wrong. Certainly two of them would do it.
  12. TroyZ

    TroyZ Active Member

    I do have the standard tank. It may not be as much of 20 inches of penetration because of the substrate being a little thicker due to it being a dirt capped substrate. The light is relatively affordable at around 60 dollars. I'll have to pick another up. Thanks!
  13. fishlady

    fishlady Well-Known Member

  14. TroyZ

    TroyZ Active Member

    Wow, that's not bad at all thanks fishlady!
    fishlady likes this.
  15. Aquaticus

    Aquaticus Administrator

    If price is an issue, you can always use some 6500k CFLs mounted vertically with reflectors. On a 4 foot tank, 4 23w CFLs would probably be right for medium light. Very inexpensive and will grow some nice plants. You can achieve medium light levels for under $30, and replacement costs are very low at less than $2 a bulb. I'm waiting to switch to LEDs when the price gets more competitive.
  16. TroyZ

    TroyZ Active Member

    I've considered that I'm just afraid of buying the wrong thing.
  17. Aquaticus

    Aquaticus Administrator

    Menards has these on sale right now: http://www.menards.com/main/lightin...aylight-cfl-bulbs-3-pack/p-1917848-c-6337.htm

    They also have a 40w, but that is probably too much unless you plan a DIY CO2 system. All of these bulbs are marked "Daylight" and are at 6500K temperature.

    You can go with clamp lights like http://www.menards.com/main/outdoor-lights/work-lights/8-1-2-deluxe-clamp-light/p-1860961-c-6405.htm or you can rig something up that looks better. CFLs produce better light (as measured in PAR) when mounted vertically with a reflector. You can run them sideways with a reflector as well, but the PAR will be slightly lower.

    On a 4 foot tank, you'll probably need four lights for a nice even spread. You could start with two and see how it goes. Some people set them on the top, which I wouldn't recommend. I like the hanging look myself (From http://plantedtank.net):

    [​IMG]

    Another one with smaller desk clamp lights:

    [​IMG]

    The key thing to remember is that adding a powerful light is going to cause algae. Your best bet to prevent this is adding a lot of plants at the same time you do your lights, so they soak up the nutrients and the light instead of the algae.

    Best bang for the buck right now.
    Cinnamonsticks likes this.
  18. TroyZ

    TroyZ Active Member

    I actually have that same system on my forty gallon. Brain fart. I didn't realize that was what you were talking about I must of skimmed past CFL. They actually do a great job on that tank. Even my swords are doing well. would you recommend a four foot fluorescent set up?
  19. Aquaticus

    Aquaticus Administrator

    Linear fluorescents are great, but you'd probably need a T5HO fixture to get medium light. I've got a two bulb fixture over my 75, and it is medium light. Your tank is deeper; you may need three. T5HO will be more expensive than CFLs. I found the two light fixture at the MARS website from a reef guy who was upgrading. At $40 it was a good deal. People always complain about bulb replacement, but I've been buying my bulbs from PKK in Middleton. Generic (Damar) brand 48" 6500K T5HO bulbs run about $6.50 each, a lot cheaper than the premium bulbs like Giesemann. At 108 watts (54w per bulb), about 70 watts more than an equivalent LED light like the Finnex Ray II (39w total). Both fixtures provide about 50 PAR at 20" depth. Ray II's run about $170 new. I'm expecting LEDs to continue to drop in price which should hopefully make them more affordable in the next couple of years. I look forward to the watt per hour and temperature deceases someday!

    If you are DIY inclined, you can find some good deals on ballasts on eBay. I've put together some dimmable 36" T5HO fixtures for my 36" tanks. The nice thing is that by starting a bulb dimmed, I can measure PAR and increase the light output later to compensate for bulb PAR reduction over time, which equals less replacement cost for bulbs. DIY isn't really that cost effective if you can find a used fixture for a good price.

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