Looking to update my knowledge

Discussion in 'Marine Fish' started by fyshy58, May 15, 2010.

  1. fyshy58

    fyshy58 New Member

    I kept Marine tanks in the late 70's and early 80's. At that time the majority of the fish were still being collected by dubious methods. I got broke (married with children) and frustrated with the whole thing.I dropped out and concentrated on freshwater. I've always kept an eye on things but I'm out of touch. I was wondering about some entry level books or sites to get caught up on the popular methods for fish only and reef aquariums.
  2. Sula

    Sula Member

    There are tons of websites for reef aquarium fanatics. The local club's site is www.madisonreef.com
    In a nutshell, the most popular methods right now are live rock for filtration, protein skimmers and water changes for nutrient export, powerheads for good flow. Depending on tank size, overflows with a sump tank underneath is very popular also to provide extra water volume, space for equipment, more water surface area, and possibly a refugium/algae scrubber for additional nutrient export. It grows exponentially from there.............
  3. fyshy58

    fyshy58 New Member

    Yeah,
    I'm just a LITTLE out of date
  4. Sula

    Sula Member

    LOL!
    Its fun, but can be almost as addicting as crack cocaine - except crack is a little less expensive ;)
    The hardest thing is figuring out what you want to keep - fish-only requires a lot less in terms of lighting and water quality, but once you want to add corals/anemones (and almost everyone does....) it can get very complicated in terms of which corals, how much light, how much flow, which fish are compatible, etc.

    One of the most popular sayings (and most true) in saltwater aquaria is that nothing good happens fast. Everything takes longer to set up, get cycled, stabilize, and make changes. I also happen to believe that there are very few "absolutes" - so rather than asking yes or no questions such as "can I keep an anemone in this tank" one should ask "what are my chances of success".....methods vary tremendously from person to person, and you will invariably find at least one person who will say that you can keep a delicate animal in what are generally considered sub-optimal conditions. I tend to lean toward the combination of factors with which the majority of people have had success.
  5. Sula

    Sula Member

    Oh, and if you want a book to look for, here is one that was recommended to me when I was starting out: The Conscientious Marine Aquarist by Fenner. I think it was published in the late 90's so it is probably getting dated but perhaps it will help bridge your knowledge from your past experience to current times :D
  6. fyshy58

    fyshy58 New Member

    Thanks,
    I'm not ready to take another dive just yet , but I would like to at least recognize the product on the shelf
  7. Dave

    Dave Moderator Staff Member

    This is good advice for aquaria in general, but is something that is difficult to get new people to appreciate.

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