Stocking recommendation for 50g planted tank?

Discussion in 'General Freshwater Aquarium Keeping' started by Sharon Page, Feb 11, 2019.

  1. Sharon Page

    Sharon Page New Member

    Hi all, my husband Kevin and I are new members and just brought home our 50g planted tank from the Great Lakes Aquascaping Championship. (Attached photo was taken just after setting it up last night in the living room)). I would love to pick your collective brains for stocking ideas.

    We're new fishkeepers. We got a 55g in Sept. and stocked it with small, peaceful fish that as adults will average 2" in size . We have schools of rummynose & ember tetras, Sterbai & aeneus cories, otos, a few male guppies, one female betta, and two young yoyo loaches.

    We have just set up the new 50 gallon as "THE" display tank in the living room and are cycling it. It is heavily planted/ferts/high-light, but no CO2. My 82 year old mom lives with us, and complains our current fish are too bland and tiny. So we want to stock the new tank with colorful fish from maybe 2-5" that will look more to my mom like a reef tank.

    We're looking for suggestions for 3-4 compatible species (~ 4 fish per group)... or a single colorful and interesting species.
    • Spawning is fine if overpopulation isn't an issue, and if the parents don't injure each other or other community fish.
    • Fish have to be okay for a planted tank--so no Malawi cichlids.
    • Bonus points for fish that are compatible with otos and cories. I am hoping to have some of each in the new tank.
    Some fish that I have been interested in are dwarf cichlids (esp. Apisto borelli) or kribs, but I will consider any and all suggestions.

    Thanks in advance for any stocking advice.

    Sharon Page
    51596370_10157208469917941_7083553488138928128_n.jpg
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2019
  2. Marine590622

    Marine590622 Advisory Board Staff Member

  3. Marine590622

    Marine590622 Advisory Board Staff Member

    We have a rainbowfish breeder in the local area if you decide you are interested I can get a list of what he has coming up.
  4. Sharon Page

    Sharon Page New Member

    Thanks for the rainbow recommendation. I must have read your mind in advance, because I got 9 Melanotaenia parva at the auction on Saturday, a CARES species. They are young and colorless at the moment, but they are fun to watch when they eat--what appetites. :) I did most of my research post-purchase, but discovered rainbows are a great option for a bit larger but still peaceful fish with a lot of color. And now I have expert confirmation! I'm looking forward to seeing your Wanaminsis at a future club meeting!
  5. Megan

    Megan Advisory Board Staff Member

    Tristan's tropical fish has locally bred S American dwarf cichlids.
  6. Sharon Page

    Sharon Page New Member

    Thanks, Megan. I would happily buy fish from Tristan. I have to check now to see if the dwarf cichlids would get along with the parva rainbows I got at the auction on Saturday. Fingers crossed. Otherwise, I'll have to get some more tanks. ;-)
  7. Marine590622

    Marine590622 Advisory Board Staff Member

    Gary Lange one of the North American Rainbow experts calls rainbows the blonds of the fish world they will end up swimming right into the ends of your tank if the ends are bare. Plant both ends heavily with tall plants.
  8. Marine590622

    Marine590622 Advisory Board Staff Member

    So with only one rainbow species in the tank, You should put a breeding mop in one of the corners and check it periodically for eggs. The parva will breed early and often. once you start seeing eggs in the mop, it is time to start replacing the mop daily and placing the used mop in a hatching tank. Your quarentine tank will work if you don't have any fish in it at the time.
  9. Sharon Page

    Sharon Page New Member

    Luckily, the tank is "filled to the gills" with tall plants and dark driftwood, so so far, so good! The parva rainbows are definitely little speed demons when the food comes out. Lucky a glass lid came with the 50g tank from the competition.
  10. Sharon Page

    Sharon Page New Member

    The parvas are 4 & 6 months old (from two spawns), and I think they start breeding around 9 months or so. I've read up on how to make mops. By then, the quarantine tank should only have shrimp in it, so hopefully will be okay for raising fry. As a CARES species, I'm hoping to have success with these guys.
  11. Marine590622

    Marine590622 Advisory Board Staff Member

    The fry will be predated by the adults. They hatch out at a pretty small size.
  12. Sharon Page

    Sharon Page New Member

    Are you saying that the tiny adult shrimp would eat rainbow fry? I had no idea the fry would be that tiny or the shrimp would be motivated to catch live food. They are fat & sassy, and mostly just sit still. :)
  13. Marine590622

    Marine590622 Advisory Board Staff Member

    No they will be predated by the adult rainbow fish, although the fry are definately smaller then the shrimp, even smaller then shrimplets
  14. Sharon Page

    Sharon Page New Member

    Thanks for clarifying. No problem, then. I have the rainbows in a 50g tank. When they get ready to spawn, I'll put a mop in there. Any time I see eggs, I'll move the mop to the 10g quarantine tank--which will only have a few shrimp in it by then--and hatch/raise the fry there. Hard to imagine fish fry will be smaller than baby shrimp!
  15. Marine590622

    Marine590622 Advisory Board Staff Member

    If you want I can bring you a mop of the Wannemensus eggs to try your hand at.
  16. Sharon Page

    Sharon Page New Member

    Thanks, I might take you up on that in the future! I'm still stocking the 50g, so QT tanks will be in use another month or two. I currently have some cories in the quarantine tank, and I assume they would eat the eggs at this point.

Share This Page